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The Nine Muses

                   The Nine Muses

Muse, inspiration, Novels, suspense, mystery, art, drawing, Alexander Wainwright, The Trilogy of Remembrance, The Drawing Lesson, visionary, Orient Express, Venice, London, vision, visionary artist.

Yes, you’ve likely heard of me—Daphne Bersault— through Alexander Wainwright, Britain’s finest landscape painter and visionary. I am or was his muse. When it comes to life, love, art and creativity, it’s hard to know just where you stand with such a great artist.

When I first saw him at breakfast in the dining car on the Orient Express, there’s no denying that  I was immediately attracted–almost like an electric shock. But because my journey was to make amends with certain parts of my past, I was in no hurry to admit the attraction even to myself. Because I was looking into the past, I believe he saw me as a woman of mystery.

muse, orient express, suspense novels, The Trilogy of Remembrance,

The Orient Express to Venice

Have you ever met someone when, in that very first moment, you feel your future is unfolding before your eyes? Perhaps that’s how fate—or love— shows up in life. Suddenly everything becomes sharper, clearer and all your senses come alive. I know it sounds absurd but it seemed as if Alexander had been sent to me for some purpose, which was not at all clear. It was certainly no casual meeting for either of us.

Muse, inspiration, Novels, suspense, mystery, art, drawing, Alexander Wainwright, The Trilogy of Remembrance, The Drawing Lesson, visionary, Orient Express, Venice, London, vision, visionary artist.

The dining car.

 

But his excitement was not only for me—a woman he had just met under romantic circumstance on the fabled Orient Express. The intense passion was for his art.

He unfurled a roll of paper on which he had drawn charcoal sketches. They were of me. Passion, strength and resilience exploded from each one of these beautiful sketches. I was at a loss to understand how I could have inspired such work.

I was really puzzled and said, “How on earth have I inspired this work? His answer was startling.

“Because you are my muse.”

“I don’t really understand. We’ve only just met. How could…?” He had poured cognac for us. When the glow began rising up in me, I felt as if I were under a magician’s spell.  I said simply, “Explain it to me.”

muse, Novels, suspense, mystery, art, drawing, Alexander Wainwright, The Trilogy of Remembrance, The Drawing Lesson, visionary, Orient Express, Venice, London

His charcoal sketches were exquisite!

He leaned forward into the lamplight. Every nuance of expression was laid bare on his face. I thought I was looking deep into his soul—and perhaps in that moment I was. His answer, to this day, remains etched on my heart.

drawing1

art, suspense, muse, mystery, award winning novels, drawing, Orient Express, The Trilogy of Remembrance, The Drawing Lesson.

With just a few strokes he had created a scene of aching intimacy.

“My art,” he began, “comes from deep within. Some places are comfortable, familiar rooms, which I have often visited in dreams and reveries. Others are wonderfully fanciful and enchanting lands. And

still others contain the terrifying stuff of nightmares. But all those places have their treasures and must be explored and intimately known if one is to create.” He touched my hand. “Some quality, an essence, within the muse is like a candle flickering in the dark, illuminating everything in those rooms. That light leads the poor artist through his own private heaven and hell ever onward to his creation.”

But what is it in me that inspires you?”

For that he had no answer. He just said, “I don’t know. I’m just a painter trying to understand life and to create art.”

My eyes fixed on his hands, which were pale, long and slender. I remember thinking Michelangelo might have painted those hands centuries ago. They brushed mine as he poured more cognac. Fingers touched but did not entwine. This spell seemed cast by a different kind of being–one I had not met before.

Without further thought, I asked, “Why are you here?” Only his effect on me could have produced such an odd question.

“I’m not sure yet but I think I’d better go now,” he answered. “The time isn’t right for us, at least not yet. But I should very much like to see you in Venice. Is that still possible?”

Although my knees felt weak, I nodded and opened the door. What sort of man says such outrageous thing—and then leaves?   

♥    ♥    ♥    ♥    ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥   ♥

The relationship was beautiful, difficult and complex. Much more lay ahead. A muse is not asked to  consent to the relationship. He or she is more or less “taken” by the artist as such. But I often wondered, if I inspired such creativity, why I had to remain only a mid-wife. Why could I not have a greater, more active role in the entire process of making something from nothing. I learned just how hard it can be to love a creative genius. If you read The Trilogy of Remembrance you may begin to understand. For me, it was a long and painful process which caused many changes in me. But, no doubt, I am forever grateful!

I will come back to visit with you. You’ll find I have many more stories to tell.  These stories are developed from the novels of The Trilogy of Remembrance [The Drawing Lesson, The Fate of Pryde and Night Crossing] and are designed to entice you to read them. This meeting on the Orient Express takes place in the first novel, The Drawing Lesson.

Alexander Wainwright, Britain’s finest landscape painter and visionary artist, is the star of the trilogy. Think of these blog posts as delightful appetizers. Enjoy and respond.

The novels of The Trilogy of Remembrance and The  Osgoode Trilogy may be found on any online bookstore but, if you are in a hurry just click here http://amazon.com/author/maryemartin

Mary E. Martin is the author of two trilogies: The Osgoode Trilogy, inspired by her many years of law practice; and The Trilogy of Remembrance, set in the glitter and shadows of the art world. Both Trilogies will elevate the reader from the rush and hectic world of today and spin them into realms of yet unimagined intrigue.

The Trilogy of Remembrance is struggling to become a QUARTET. The next volume should be published in 2018

Here is the first chapter of  The Wondrous Apothecary 

http://maryemartintrilogies.com/the-wondrous-apothecary/

Mary E. Martin is the author of two trilogies: The Osgoode Trilogy, inspired by her many years of law practice and The Trilogy of Remembrance, set in the glitter and shadows of the art world. Both Trilogies will elevate the reader from the rush and hectic world of today and spin them into realms of yet unimagined intrigue. Be inspired by the final installment of The Trilogy of Remembrance, Night Crossing.

Coming soon! This trilogy has a fourth novel The Wondrous Apothecary which will be published 2019. Find out more…  http://maryemartintrilogies.com/the-wondrous-apothecary/

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The novels of The Trilogy of Remembrance and The Osgoode Trilogy are available almost anywhere online including Amazon. Just click the coin below.

• The Trilogy of Remembrance, Alexander Wainwright, The Drawing Lesson, The Fate of Pryde, Night Crossing, visions, visionary artist, award winning novels, artists, art, creativity, inspiration, literature, thought provoking novels, magic realism, muse, spirituality, philosophy of life, suspense novels, romance, novels with contests, novels with depth, novels with ideas, Novels about art and artists, book trailers. Protagonist throughout trilogy

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8 thoughts on “The Muse-Daphne of New York

  1. Mary what a great prolog.
    From what I have read of your work. I know I am going to totally enjoy reading ” Trilogy of Remembrance “

    • While yo’re on the site, why not sign up for the newsletter and to follow the blog. I have a lot of fun with this blog and sometimes Alexander and his agent James Helmsworth drop in to say a few words and exchange stories.

    • Thank you so much Herb. Each trilogy is set in its own world.The Osgood Trilogy was named after the law courts in Toronto…Osgoode Hall. Is of law practice. Lawyers hear a lot of “stories”. The Trilogy of Remembrance is set in the art world for which I have had a lifelong love. n that trilogy, I drew on my many year

  2. I posted a recommendation for the “Osgood Trilogy ” on your twitter account. I didn’t know where else to post it.

  3. A muse inspires thought ,action, passion. Many people choose a career because a teacher, mentor, family friend or member set an example or opened a door in the mind of the men tee. In this sense a muse provides a similar function. In both cases there may be an understanding of the source of inspiration. In some cases the source may be only indirectly a source of inspiration and possibly not even recognized as such by the person inspired. You have written a Great illustration of a muse in action!

    • Yes, David Juvet, creativity flows through all of life hopefully affecting all we do. When I was writing about Daphne, it occured to me that while we so often speak of the artist, surely the muse her/himself is affected profoundly. Daphne asks why she cannot be involved in Alex’s creativity too. Agree?

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