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Cannes Film Festival, Chronic, Michael Franco, Tim Roth, Toronto International Film Festival, assisted suicide, euthanasia, chronic disease, palliative care, novels, art, film, Supreme Court of Canada,  law.

Beautiful Cannes. Home of the Cannes Film Festival.

The Cannes Film Festival is underway from May 13th to the 27th. While browsing and wishing I could be there, I came across this film, Chronic, written and directed by Michael Franco and starring Tim Roth.

It’s about a nurse, David, played by Roth, who works with and assists terminally ill patients. We learn that he is dedicated to his work and performs with efficiency and warmth. Very empathetic by nature, he develops strong, intimate relationships with his patients. But when not at work, David is ineffectual, awkward and reserved. His relationships with his patients are definitely a two way street. He needs them as much as they need him.

Because it hasn’t opened yet, there’s not a lot of information about the film which is nominated for the Palme D’or. It will be screened on May 22nd at the Cannes Film Festival.

Stills from the film Chronic shown at the Cannes Film Festival. Relatives of patients.

Cannes Film Festival, Chronic, Michael Franco, Tim Roth, Toronto International Film Festival, assisted suicide, euthanasia, chronic disease, palliative care, novels, art, film, Supreme Court of Canada,  law.

Questions in the cemetery?

 

Cannes Film Festival, Chronic, Michael Franco, Tim Roth, Toronto International Film Festival, assisted suicide, euthanasia, chronic disease, palliative care, novels, art, film, Supreme Court of Canada,  law.

Relaxing with family members?

Recently, the Supreme Court of Canada decided that Canadians had the right to assisted suicide. Such a divisive issue is now settled unless the Canadian government passes new laws [better laws] within the space of a year.

Cannes Film Festival, Chronic, Michael Franco, Tim Roth, Toronto International Film Festival, assisted suicide, euthanasia, chronic disease, palliative care, novels, art, film, Supreme Court of Canada,  law.

The Supreme Cou.rt of Canada, Ottawa

When I practised law, I often acted for the elderly and infirm. In some of those cases, I found that there was, from time to time, pressure [subtle and not so subtle] from certain relatives to have Granny ‘move on to a better place’.  On the other hand, I saw others suffering needlessly and hideously because no one could legally assist.

I was definitely of two minds and recalled someone saying, “Once we have the right to die, can the obligation be far behind?”

When this film comes to the Toronto International Film Festival in September from the Cannes Film Festival, I’ll be sure to see it. Take a look at these two clips.

Here you see him looking after a patient.

And here he is after the funeral of another patient.

There is no doubt that this film will present us with difficult and uncomfortable questions about a really sensitive topic. But I love the way these clips tantalize us with the prospect of exploring such complex issues.

I’d be delighted if you’d take the time to let me know your views. Should we have the right to die? What safe-guards should we have in place?

Mary E. Martin is the author of two trilogies: The Osgoode Trilogy, inspired by her many years of law practice; and The Trilogy of Remembrance, set in the glitter and shadows of the art world. Both Trilogies will elevate the reader from the rush and hectic world of today and spin them into realms of yet unimagined intrigue. Be inspired by the newly released and final installment of The Trilogy of Remembrance, Night Crossing. Presently, The Drawing Lesson is a Wattpad Featured novel which you can read in it’s entirety right here Wattpad.com 

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